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Edward Tufte is a pioneer in the field of data visualization, and his works have inspired the creation of two LaTeX classes for books and handouts, along with other style elements often present in LaTeX documents. Checkout a selection below.

Implementing the Teachings of Edward Tufte
Implementing the Teachings of Edward Tufte
Handouts should be made to complement serious presentations. The purpose of this handout is to summarize the Edward Tufte lecture on June 16th, 2016 in Chicago. Tufte began and ended his lecture wordlessly with a clip from the Music Animation Machine project and it is one of the metaphors used for the beautiful potential of clarity in information display. Relatively large amounts of information are displayed in context; the data contains the past, present, and future, and in a short matter of time, the viewer can predict the duration, pitch and sound of the notes heard based on the visual experience of the data. This is a beautiful metaphor for the potential of immediate visual context in multiscale imaging.
Kristy Wendt
A Tufte-Style Book with VDQI Title and Contents Page
A Tufte-Style Book with VDQI Title and Contents Page
This is a modified version of the Tufte Book example, but with the title page and the contents page resembling Tufte's VDQI book, using Kevin Godby's code from this thread.
Example by The Tufte-LaTeX Developers with modifications
Modeling Exercise Set X
Modeling Exercise Set X
Template for Modeling and Simulation Exercises at Olin College
mark somerville
Sprint Beyond the Book (2016)
Sprint Beyond the Book (2016)
Emerging technologies continue to transform the ways we collect, synthesize, disseminate, and consume information. These advances present both hazards and opportunities for the future of scholarly publication and communication. During this book sprint—presented by the Center for Science and the Imagination at Arizona State University and the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) and embedded in SSP’s 2016 annual meeting in Vancouver—we discussed issues of increasing scholarly impact and accessibility, wondered whether computers can make scholarly contributions that warrant co-authorship, speculated about what forms scholarly books may take in the future, and more. Tackling ambitious and often ambiguous questions like these requires a diverse group of thinkers and writers and an innovative approach to writing. The book sprint method provides this innovation. Throughout the annual meeting, we held six miniature book sprints. During each sprint, we convened a group of four to six writers to tackle one of six big questions. Each sprint began with a facilitated conversation, followed by time for our writers to reflect and compose a piece of writing inspired by the conversation. Each piece was composed on Overleaf using this template specially created for this undertaking. Conferences like the SSP annual meeting and scholarly publications themselves are often undergirded by spontaneous, inspiring, thought-provoking conversations among colleagues and collaborators, but those conversations are rarely captured and shared, and are often clouded in memory, even for the participants. The book sprint process hopefully absorbs some of the kismet and energy of those initial conversations, right at the start of a big idea, and makes it part of a more durable intellectual product—and a possible springboard for additional conversations in a broader range of times and places. The work would not have been possible without the contributions of our four core sprinters—Madeline Ashby, Annalee Newitz, Roopika Risam, and Ido Roll—who participated in every session, and the many SSP members who participated in the individual sprints and shared their expertise. All of our content is free to read at http://sprintbeyondthebook.com, and free to download and share under a Creative Commons license.
Created collaboratively in 72 hours at SSP2016 — see PDF for full author and contributor lists
Sprint Beyond the Book - Template
Sprint Beyond the Book - Template
This is the writing template for the ``Sprint Beyond the Book'' sessions at SSP 2016. We invite you to join our team of science fiction authors, scholars, digital publishers, journalists, and technologists to write, edit, assemble and publish a book about the future of scholarly publishing on-the-fly in 72 hours. We will employ a variety of collaborative technologies and explore the idea of writing as a performance. In order to pull off this ambitious plan, we need your help! Please stop by to help brainstorm, write, or edit contributions. Each concurrent session will confront participants with different provocation about the future of scholarly publishing. Find out more about the sessions on the SSP 2016 website.
John Hammersley and Mary Anne Baynes
The Cantor Set
The Cantor Set
An overview of the Cantor Set and its connection to counting.
Andy
Kelly bet sizing
Kelly bet sizing
This document derives Kelly's rule for optimal bet sizing.
Humility Consulting
Shiitake Cultivation on Logs
Shiitake Cultivation on Logs
Shiitake are delicious and easy to grow. They can be an excellent alternative crop because much of the work required can be done in the off-season. In addition, Shiitake grows in the shade of a forest and so does not compete for cultivated land. Shiitake are a source of vitamins, minerals, and up to 30\% protein with all essential amino acids. The objective of this one day hands-on workshop is to introduce farmers to the basic steps required to grow shiitake on logs. The course begins with an overview of fungal 'behavior' - the ecology and physiology of how they grow, fruit, reproduce, and interact with other organisms. This will provide a foundation for understanding how to cultivate and care for your logs and their fungal guests. We will learn to identify oaks, fell trees, and identify a suitable locations for logs. During incubation and fruiting stages. Lunch will provide an informal opportunity for questions. Following lunch, we will learn how to inoculate logs with shiitake spawn, and then set up a demonstration production line. Finally, we will discuss taking care of logs, forcing them to fruit on schedule, and some ideas on marketing. I hope that by the end of this class, students will leave ready to start a small shiitake production operation on their own.
David
Lab Notes Template
Lab Notes Template
Laboratory Notes Template by Mikhail Klassen, April 2013, Contributions from Sarah Mount, May 2014. This version of the template is based on the tuft-latex class.
Sarah Mount

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HandoutHomework AssignmentMathBiberBibLaTeXDynamic FiguresNewsletterResearch DiaryBookSociety for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) 2016